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Tuesday , 25 October 2016
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​ TEEAL to enhance access to agricultural research in Bangladesh

Hyderabad, August 5, 2015TEEAL (The Essential Electronic Agricultural Library), established in 1999, is a program of Cornell University Library’s Albert R. Mann Library, in partnership with leading publishers, to provide access to agricultural research literature. With support from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and in cooperation with Sathguru Management Consultants, TEEAL sets are being placed in universities and research institutions in Bangladesh and training is being provided in the use of electronic research.

TEEAL contains almost 500,000 articles from more than 350 highly ranked research journals in agriculture and related biological sciences. Universities, colleges, research institutes, government ministries and policymakers in 110 low-income countries with limited or no internet connectivity can access the research literature through TEEAL help improve the agricultural sector of eligible countries. TEEAL’s searchable database offers direct access to full-text materials without internet connectivity and is easy to install and use. TEEAL is compatible with a standalone computer or multiple user workstations and is highly recommended for use on local area networks.

On this occasion  Mr K. Vijayraghavan, Chairman of Sathguru Management Consultants, which is the regional coordinator for TEEAL said, “We hope the agricultural research community of Bangladesh would immensely benefit with the access of TEEAL and would help increase innovation in the sector. The student and research community can now easily access world class research material even when they are constrained with internet connectivity.”

TEEAL was founded on the belief that long-term improvements in food security and agricultural development would not be possible without giving scientists better access to current research. It is a searchable, offline, digital library available to public and nonprofit institutions in developing countries.

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