Follow my blog with Bloglovin
Saturday , 19 August 2017
Breaking News

NON-VEGETARIAN AND SINGLE? You are going to have trouble finding a home!

~NestAway study that analyses the various biases and discrimination that people often face while finding rental accommodation in Indian cities~

New Delhi, Jan 19, 2017: Urban migration is known to have a positive impact on a country’s economic development. Moving to a new city comes with its own set of challenges, all the more in a diverse country like India. To understand consumer preferences and experiences while looking for rental accommodation and moving into new cities, India’s fastest growing online home rental network NestAway has come out with an interesting report titled ‘Ease of Settling In’.

The study is a result of consumer survey conducted across key cities namely Bangalore, NCR, Mumbai, Pune and Hyderabad, and analysis based on NestAway’s in-depth understanding of the subject. There were 3000 respondents for the survey, aged anywhere between 21 and 31 years. More than 57% of the respondents were in the age group of 21-24 across the five cities with 88% being single.

NestAway has also identified different kinds of barriers and biases urban migrants (especially the unmarried) face while searching for an accommodation in a new city. Right from finding a place to call home to making new friends, to adapting to new ways of living, they all come with their own challenges.

When asked to consider between security deposit, lock-in period and brokerage as factors that help them narrow down on a house, 40% of respondents said that security deposit was the make or break factor. When it comes to living in a rented apartment, 26% of the respondents picked neighbourhood safety as their most important need over utilities and amenities. While that’s understandable, the surprising bit is that 25% picked mobile network reception which is almost equal to neighbourhood safety.

Commenting on the report, Amarendra Sahu, Founder & CEO, NestAway said, “India is a complex market for urban migrants and we all know that biases and discriminations exist. It is not easy to settle into any new city. Hence it becomes all the more important for us to create an ecosystem that is welcoming and addresses the trust deficit that exists between landlords and tenants which often leads to various issues.”

The ‘Ease of Settling In’ report also shows that if you’re either a landlord or a broker, you’re not exactly an urban migrant’s favourite person. Funnily, equal number of people found both, landlords and brokers difficult to deal with. However if you look at the split between brokers (29%), landlords (29%), neighbours (22%) and building security (20%) the spread is so even that it feels like almost everyone has a beef to pick with urban migrants in all cities.

The study also tries to understand one of the biggest problems urban migrants face while house hunting – Biases. Across food preference (non-vegetarian), relationship status, where you hail from, physical appearance and religion/caste, majority of the people (19%) found being non-vegetarian is a big issue while looking for a house. Not surprisingly, coming close to the food issue was the relationship status at 17% that prevented people from getting a house on rent.

Basically, if you eat non-vegetarian food and haven’t married yet, it’s going to be hard for you to find a home to rent in India.

The NestAway report also went on to show some of the common restrictions that tenants face like having guests of opposite sex, relatives and friends who need a place to stay, lifestyle, entry-exit time curfews, cooking certain types of food and pets.  While majority of the people, which is 19%, are asked to not have guests of the opposite sex, a combined whopping 61% of restrictions were related to the lifestyle young people have.

Key findings summary

  • One of biggest challenges while moving into a new city was house hunting and quality of food with more than 21% respondents voting for it
  • When it comes to living in a rented apartment, 26% of the respondents picked neighbourhood safety as their most important need over utilities and amenities. The surprising bit is that 25% picked mobile network reception, which is almost equal to neighbourhood safety
  • Funnily, equal number of people found both, landlords and brokers difficult to deal with. However if you look at the split between brokers (29%), landlords (29%), neighbours (22%) and building security (20%) the spread is so even that it feels like almost everyone has a beef to pick with urban migrants in all cities
  • Across food preference (non-vegetarian), relationship status, where you hail from, physical appearance and religion/caste, majority of the people (19%) found being non-vegetarian is a big issue while looking for a house. Not surprisingly, coming close to the food issue was the relationship status at 17% that prevented people from getting a house on rent.
  • A combined whopping 61% of restrictions were related to the lifestyle young people have. This is a bigger problem for men as compared to women. We think it could be because of the assumption that men drink more than women.
  • Also turns out that being a non-vegetarian is the hardest in Bangalore and being unmarried is the hardest in Hyderabad and Mumbai.
  • Zooming out a bit more on this data, it turns out that Southern India considers security deposit as their top criteria at 50%(which could be because security deposit is equal to 10 months’ rent in South India) while Northern India, 40% of them, peg brokerage as the most important factor.

Comments are closed.

Scroll To Top
badge